• Kim Kortum

Why we travel public lands

Updated: Jan 23

Traveling can be cost prohibitive for many families. When I was a child we only ever went to one place: a campground in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area that was remote and affordable. It was a beautiful, peaceful place. As I started to travel on my own, I really wanted to find out what other beautiful, peaceful, affordable places there were to visit.


Traveling can also be overwhelming for many families. It's difficult to know where you can go with kids, where they will be welcome and also enjoy themselves. It's difficult to choose a place that you know will be worthwhile from the millions of destinations, resorts, activities, etc.


Did you know that there are already places that have been set aside for you to enjoy? These are places of great significance that have been preserved and are maintained for our enjoyment. Many of them are absolutely free to visit. Many can be visited by paying one entrance fee that is good for all properties for a year. The significance of these places ranges from cultural and social to geological, natural, and environmental. Visitors can learn, be active, or relax while they sit back and take in views. There is something that will interest everyone.


These places are your public lands.


We have been traveling public lands for over twenty years, first as a young married couple and now with our family. Friends are always commenting about how amazing our trips look and how they wish they could come along. Through this blog, now you can. Join me here as I share some of our previous trip itineraries, tips for how to travel affordably, and some amazing places we have been that we would love to see you visit too.


Visit publiclandstraveler on Instagram for pics of our trips

https://www.instagram.com/publiclandstraveler/







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